Placeholder Picture
Today is
Ling Clan Visitors:

~ The Ling Clan ~

spacer

Due to all the recent developments in my research, name changes, dates, etc., and this being just in the last 50 or so years, I've decided to update the narrative. After reading the following you will better understand the reasons for the difficulties in finding your genealogical past.

The earliest chronologies date back to Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, though no historical writers in these early civilizations were known by name. By contrast, the term "historiography" is taken to refer to written history recorded in a narrative format for the purpose of informing future generations about events. In this limited sense, "ancient history" begins with the early historiography of Classical Antiquity, in about the 5th century BCE (Before Current Era or better known as Before Christ).

The 5th century BCE, in China, is the earliest written narrative of history in the world and covers the period from 722 to 468 BCE The Classic of History is one of the Five Classics of Chinese classic texts and one of the earliest narratives of China. The Spring and Autumn Annals, the official chronicle of the State of Lu covering the period from 722 to 481 BCE, is among the earliest surviving historical texts to be arranged on annalistic principles in the world. It is traditionally attributed to Confucius (551–479 BCE).

The earliest known systematic historical thought emerged in ancient Greece, a development which would be an important influence on the writing of history elsewhere around the Mediterranean region. The earliest known critical historical works were The Histories, composed by Herodotus of Halicarnassus (484–425 BCE) who became known as the "father of history". Herodotus attempted to distinguish between more and less reliable accounts, and personally conducted research by travelling extensively, giving written accounts of various Mediterranean cultures. Although Herodotus' overall emphasis lay on the actions and characters of men, he also attributed an important role to divinity in the determination of historical events.

The Romans adopted the Greek tradition, writing at first in Greek, but eventually chronicling their history in a freshly non-Greek language. While early Roman works were still written in Greek, the Origines, composed by the Roman statesman Cato the Elder (234–149 BCE), was written in Latin, in a conscious effort to counteract Greek cultural influence. It marked the beginning of Latin historical writings. Hailed for its lucid style, Julius Caesar's (100–44 BCE) de Bello Gallico exemplifies autobiographical war coverage. The politician and orator Cicero (106–43 BCE) introduced rhetorical elements in his political writings.

Strabo (63 BCE – c. 24 CE, current or common era, or as we know it, AD, Anno Domini, after death, or year of our Lord) was an important exponent of the Greco-Roman tradition of combining geography with history, presenting a descriptive history of peoples and places known to his era. Livy (59 BCE – 17 CE) records the rise of Rome from city-state to empire. His speculation about what would have happened if Alexander the Great had marched against Rome represents the first known instance of alternate history, (Alternate history or alternative history sometimes abbreviated as AH, is a genre of fiction consisting of stories in which one or more historical events occur differently. These stories usually contain "what if" scenarios at crucial points in history and present outcomes other than those in the historical record). A widely used genre in the entertainment industry.

Christian historiography began early, perhaps as early as Luke-Acts, which is the primary source for the Apostolic Age, though its historical reliability is disputed. In the first Christian centuries, the New Testament canon was developed. The growth of Christianity and its enhanced status in the Roman Empire after Constantine, led to the development of a distinct Christian historiography, influenced by both Christian theology and the nature of the Christian Bible, encompassing new areas of study and views of history.

Muslim historical writings first began to develop in the 7th century, with the reconstruction of the Prophet Muhammad's life in the centuries following his death. With numerous conflicting narratives regarding Muhammad and his companions from various sources.

French philosopher Voltaire (1694–1778) had an enormous influence on the development of historiography during the Age of Enlightenment through his demonstration of fresh new ways to look at the past. At the same time, philosopher David Hume was having a similar effect on the study of history in Great Britain. In 1754 he published the History of England, a 6-volume work which extended "From the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688". Hume adopted a similar scope to Voltaire in his history; as well as the history of Kings, Parliaments, and armies, he examined the history of culture, including literature and science, as well. His short biographies of leading scientists explored the process of scientific change and he developed new ways of seeing scientists in the context of their times by looking at how they interacted with society and each other.

He also argued that the quest for liberty was the highest standard for judging the past, and concluded that after considerable fluctuation, England at the time of his writing had achieved "the most entire system of liberty, that was ever known amongst mankind.

The apex of Enlightenment history was reached with Edward Gibbon's monumental six-volume work, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, published on 17 February 1776. Because of its relative objectivity and heavy use of primary sources, its methodology became a model for later historians. This has led to Gibbon being called the first "modern historian".

Placeholder Picture

East Anglia: with the administrative counties of Norfolk and Suffolk (in red) to the north and south respectively and Cambridgeshire (in pink) to the west

Here is something I found on Ancestry.com, Ling Name Meaning: English (mainly East Anglia): (East Anglia is a geographical area in the East of England. The area included has varied, but the legally defined NUTS 2, Nomenclature of territorial units for statistics, is a hierarchical system for dividing up the economic territory of the European Union), comprising the counties of Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire, including the City of Peterborough unitary authority. The name derives from the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of the East Angles, a tribe that originated in Angeln, northern Germany.) habitational name from Lyng in Norfolk, so named from Old English hlinc 'hillside', or from either of two places in Norfolk and Lincolnshire named Ling, from Old Norse lyng 'ling', 'heather'. There is also a Lyng in Somerset, so named from Old English lengen 'long place'. German: variant of Link. Read more

We can exclude this section but it is interesting.Chinese : from a word meaning 'ice'. In ancient times, the imperial palace was able to enjoy ice in the summer by storing winter ice in a cellar, entrusting its care to an official called the iceman. This post was once filled during the Zhou dynasty (1122–221 bc) by a descendant of Kang Shu, the eighth son of Wen Wang, who had been granted the state of Wei soon after the establishment of the Zhou dynasty. Descendants of this particular iceman adopted the word for ice, ling, as their surname.

I will be adding more to this site soon. I have found our ancestry link going as far back as 1469, the last name then was Langk, changed to Lange aka Lang and THEN Ling. There seems to be a huge difference in name spelling back in the day. maybe it was due to the fact that writing ones name was not something they could do or that the writing was so chicken scratch due to the writing instruments of the time. Who knows. Now we can start...

~ Holy Roman Empire ~

Placeholder Picture

The Holy Roman Empire (Latin: Sacrum Imperium Romanum; German: Heiliges Römisches Reich) was a complex of territories in Central Europe and parts of Western Europe that developed during the Early Middle Ages and continued until its dissolution in 1806. The largest territory of the empire after 962 was the Kingdom of Germany, though it also came to include the Kingdom of Bohemia, the Kingdom of Burgundy, the Kingdom of Italy, and numerous other territories.

Charlemagne or Charles the Great 2 April 742 – 28 January 814, numbered Charles I, was King of the Franks from 768, King of the Lombards from 774 and Holy Roman Emperor from 800. He united much of Europe during the early Middle Ages. The expanded Frankish state that Charlemagne founded is called the Carolingian Empire.

On 25 December 800, Pope Leo III crowned the Frankish King Charlemagne, as Emperor, reviving the title in Western Europe, more than three centuries after the fall of the Western Roman Empire. The title continued in the Carolingian family until 888 and from 896 to 899, after which it was contested by the rulers of Italy in a series of civil wars until the death of the last Italian claimant, Berengar, in 924. The Massacre at Verden produced perhaps the greatest stain on Charlemagne's reputation.

The precise term “Holy Roman Empire” was not used until the 13th century, but the concept of translatio imperii[e] was fundamental to the prestige of the emperor, the notion that he held supreme power inherited from the emperors of Rome. The office of Holy Roman Emperor was traditionally elective, although frequently controlled by dynasties. The German prince-electors, the highest ranking noblemen of the empire, usually elected one of their peers as “King of the Romans”, and he would later be crowned emperor by the Pope; the tradition of papal coronations was discontinued in the 16th century. The empire never achieved the extent of political unification formed in France, evolving instead into a decentralized, limited elective monarchy composed of hundreds of sub-units, principalities, duchies, counties, Free Imperial Cities, and other domains. The power of the emperor was limited, and while the various princes, lords, and kings of the empire were vassals and subjects who owed the emperor their allegiance, they also possessed an extent of privileges that gave them de facto sovereignty within their territories. Emperor Francis II dissolved the empire on 6 August 1806, after its defeat by Napoleon at the Battle of Austerlitz. The Battle of Austerlitz, 2 December 1805/11 Frimaire An XIV FRC, also known as the Battle of the Three Emperors, was one of the most important and decisive engagements of the Napoleonic Wars. In what is widely regarded as the greatest victory achieved by Napoleon, the Grande Armée of France defeated a larger Russian and Austrian army led by Tsar Alexander I and Holy Roman Emperor Francis II. The battle occurred near the town of Austerlitz in the Austrian Empire (modern-day Slavkov u Brna in the Czech Republic). Austerlitz brought the War of the Third Coalition to a rapid end, with the Treaty of Pressburg signed by the Austrians later in the month. The battle is often cited as a tactical masterpiece, in the same league as other historic engagements like Cannae or Arbela.

The territories and dominion of the Holy Roman Empire in terms of present-day states comprised Germany (except Southern Schleswig), Austria (except Burgenland), the Czech Republic, Switzerland and Liechtenstein, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg and Slovenia (except Prekmurje), besides significant parts of eastern France (mainly Artois, Alsace, Franche-Comté, French Flanders, Savoy and Lorraine), northern Italy (mainly Lombardy, Piedmont, Emilia-Romagna, Tuscany, Trentino and South Tyrol), and western Poland (mainly Silesia, Pomerania and Neumark). Since this was all territory of the Holy Roman Empire, one might surmise that Hitler wanted to get it all back, ergo WWII.

The term sacrum (i.e., “holy” in the sense of "consecrated") in connection with the medieval Roman Empire was used from 1157, under Frederick I Barbarossa. (“Holy Empire”; the form “Holy Roman Empire” is attested from 1254 onward). The term was added to reflect Frederick's ambition to dominate Italy and the Papacy. Before 1157, the realm was merely referred to as the Roman Empire.

In a decree following the 1512 Diet of Cologne, the name was officially changed to Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation. This form was first used in a document in 1474. The Holy Roman Empire was named after the Roman Empire and was considered its continuation.

The French Enlightenment writer Voltaire remarked sardonically: This agglomeration which was called and which still calls itself the Holy Roman Empire was neither holy, nor Roman, nor an empire.”

The Holy Roman Empire looked to Charlemagne, King of the Franks, as its founder, who had been crowned Emperor of the Romans on Christmas Day in 800 by Pope Leo III. The Western Roman Empire was thus revived by transferring it to the Frankish king. This remained the basis for the Holy Roman Empire, at least in theory, until its demise in 1806.

The Carolingian imperial crown was initially disputed among the Carolingian rulers of Western Francia (France) and Eastern Francia (Germany), with first the western king, Charles the Bald, 13 June 823 – 6 October 877, King of West Francia (843–77), King of Italy (875–77) and Holy Roman Emperor (875–77, as Charles II). After a series of civil wars during the reign of his father, Louis the Pious, Charles succeeded by the Treaty of Verdun (843) in acquiring the western third of the Carolingian Empire. He was a grandson of Charlemagne and the youngest son of Louis the Pious by his second wife, Judith, and then the eastern king, Charles the Fat, 13 June 839 – 13 January 888), also known as Charles III, Carolingian Emperor from 881 to 888. The youngest son of Louis the German and Hemma, Charles was a great-grandson of Charlemagne and was the last Carolingian to rule over the briefly re-united empire. However, after the death of Charles the Fat in 888, the Carolingian Empire broke asunder, never to be restored. According to Regino of Prüm, each part of the realm elected a “ kinglet” from its own bowels. After the death of Charles the Fat, those crowned Emperor by the Pope controlled only territories in Italy. The last such Emperor was Berengar I, 845-924, King of Italy from 887, and Holy Roman Emperor after 915, until his death. He is usually known as Berengar of Friuli, since he ruled the March of Friuli from 874 until at least 890, but he had lost control of the region by 896

~ Hesse, Germany ~

Placeholder Picture

The English name “Hesse” comes from French or the Hessian dialect. The variant “Hessia” comes from the medieval Hassia. The German term Hessen is used by the European Commission, not because it is English, but because their general policy is to leave regional names untranslated. The term “Hessia” ultimately derives from a Germanic tribe called the Chatti, who settled in the region in the first century B.C. The cultural region of Hesse includes both the State of Hesse and the area known as Rhenish Hesse in the neighboring Rhineland-Palatinate state. The oldest and second largest Hessian city, Mainz, is in Rhenish Hesse. The State of Hesse, Land Hessen, literally “Country of Hesse”, is part of the larger cultural region. It has an area of 8,150 sq mi and just over six million inhabitants. The state capital is Wiesbaden. Hesse's largest city is Frankfurt.

An inhabitant of Hesse is called a Hessian
Hesse (masculine)
Hessin (feminine)

During the American Revolution, 1775 to 1783, Hessian soldiers were hired out to Great Britain to help fight the colonists. The Hessian’s were told they would be helping the colonists to fight the indians... yeah right!

As early as the Paleolithic period, the Central Hessian region was inhabited. Due to the favorable climate of the location, people lived there about 50,000 years ago during the last glacial period, as burial sites show from this era. Finds of paleolitical tools in southern Hesse in Rüsselsheim suggest Pleistocene hunters about 13,000 years ago.

The Züschen tomb is a prehistoric burial monument, located between Lohne and Züschen, near Fritzlar, Hesse, Germany. Classified as a gallery grave or a Hessian-Westphalian stone cist, it is one of the most important megalithic monuments in Central Europe. Dating to the late 4th millennium BC (and possibly remaining in use until the early 3rd), it belongs to the Late Neolithic Wartberg culture.

A Famous resident of Hesse was Jacob Ludwig Carl Grimm. READ MORE

~ Darmstadt, Hesse, Germany ~

Placeholder Picture

Darmstadt is a city in the Bundesland (federal state) of Hesse in Germany, located in the southern part of the Rhine Main Area.

The sandy soils in the Darmstadt area, ill-suited for agriculture in times before industrial fertilization, prevented any larger settlement from developing, until the city became the seat of the Landgraves of Hessen-Darmstadt in the 16th century. Langrave Philip I of Hessen-Darmstadt, Philip was the son of Landgrave William II of Hesse and his second wife Anna of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. His father died when Philip was five years old, and in 1514 his mother, after a series of struggles with the Estates of Hesse, succeeded in becoming regent on his behalf. (read more)

As the administrative centre of an increasingly prosperous duchy, the city gained in prominence during the following centuries. In the 20th century, industry (especially chemicals) as well as large science and electronics (later information technology) sectors became increasingly important, and are still a major part of the city’s economy. Darmstadt also has a large tertiary education sector, with three major universities and numerous associated institutions.

Darmstadt is one of few cities (as opposed to smaller towns) in Germany which does not lie close to a river, lake or coast. It is the sunniest city in the state of Hesse. The chemical element darmstadtium (atomic number 110) is named after it, having been synthesized in the GSI Centre for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt-Wixhausen.

The name Darmstadt first appears towards the end of the 11th century, then Darmundestat. Literally translated, the current German name Darmstadt means “Intestine City.” This is just a coincidence however, and the origins of the name are unknown. 'Dar-mund' in Middle Low German is translated as “Boggy Headlands”, but it could be a misspelling in local dialect of another name. Even locals often believe, incorrectly, that the name derives from the ‘Darmbach’ (a small stream formerly running through the city). In fact the stream received its current name much later, after the city, not vice versa.

Darmstadt was chartered as a city by the Holy Roman Emperor Ludwig the Bavarian in 1330, at which time it belonged to the counts of Katzenelnbogen. The city, then called Darmstait, became a secondary residence for the counts, with a small castle being established at the site of the current, much larger edifice.

When the house of Katzenelnbogen became extinct in 1479, the city was passed to the Landgraviate of Hesse, and was the seat of the ruling landgraves (1567–1806) and thereafter (to 1918) of the Grand Dukes of Hesse. Louis IV (Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig Karl) (12 September 1837 – 13 March 1892) was the Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine, reigning from 13 June 1877 until his death. Through his own and his children's marriages he was connected to the British Royal Family, to the Imperial House of Russia and to other reigning dynasties of Europe.

Louis was born at the Prinz-Karl-Palais in Darmstadt, the capital of the Grand Duchy of Hesse and by Rhine in the German Confederation, the first son and child of Prince Charles of Hesse and by Rhine (23 April 1809 – 20 March 1877) and Princess Elisabeth of Prussia (18 June 1815 – 21 March 1885), granddaughter of King Frederick William II of Prussia. As his father's elder brother Louis III (1806-1877), the reigning Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine, had been married to his first wife since 1833 without legitimate children and from 1868 was married morganatically, Prince Louis was the likely heir eventual to the grand ducal throne from childhood.

On 1 July 1862, Louis married Princess Alice, the third child of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom, at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight.[1] On the day of the wedding, the Queen issued a royal warrant granting her new son-in-law the style of Royal Highness in the United Kingdom. The Queen also subsequently made Prince Louis a knight of the Order of the Garter.

Although an arranged marriage orchestrated by the bride's father Albert, Prince Consort, the couple did have a brief period of courtship before betrothal and wed willingly, even after the death of the Prince Consort left Queen Victoria in a protracted state of grief that cast a pall over the nuptials. Becoming parents in less than a year following their marriage, the young royal couple found themselves strapped financially to maintain the lifestyle expected of their rank.[2] Princess Alice's interest in social services, scientific development, hands-on child-rearing, charity and intellectual stimulation were not shared by Louis who, although dutiful and benevolent, was bluff in manner and conventional in his pursuits. The death of the younger of their two sons, Frittie, who was afflicted with hemophilia and suffered a fatal fall from a palace window before his third birthday in 1873, combined with the wearying war relief duties Alice had undertaken in 1870, evoked a crisis of spiritual faith for the princess in which her husband does not appear to have shared.

In 1866 the Austrians suffered defeat in the Austro-Prussian War and the Hessian grandduchy was in jeopardy of being awarded as the spoils of war to victorious Prussia, which annexed some of Austria's other allies (Hanover, Hesse-Cassel, Nassau), a fate from which Hesse-Darmstadt appears to have been spared only by a cession of territory and the close dynastic kinship between its ruler and the Emperor of Russia (Alexander II's consort, Empress Maria Alexandrovna, was the sister of Hesse's Grand Duke Louis III and of Prince Charles).

In the Franco-Prussian War provoked by Bismarck's manipulation of the Ems telegram in 1870, Hesse and by Rhine this time found itself a winning ally of Prussia's, and Prince Louis was credited with courageous military service, especially at the Battle of Gravelotte, which also afforded him the opportunity of mending the previous war's grievances with the House of Hohenzollern by fighting on the same side as his brother-in-law and future emperor, Prince Frederick of Prussia.

In March 1877, Louis became heir presumptive to the Hessian throne when his father died and, less than three months later, found himself reigning grand duke upon the demise of his uncle, Louis III.

A year and a half later, however, Grand Duke Louis was stricken with diphtheria along with most of his immediate family, from which he recovered but to which his four-year-old daughter Marie succumbed, along with his wife of 16 years. From then on, he reigned and raised his five surviving children alone.

The couple had seven children:

Victoria Mountbatten, Marchioness of Milford Haven (5 April 1863 – 24 September 1950)
Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna of Russia (1 November 1864 – 18 July 1918)
Princess Irene of Prussia (11 July 1866 – 11 November 1953)
Ernest Louis, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine (25 November 1868 – 9 October 1937)
Prince Friedrich of Hesse and by Rhine (7 October 1870 – 29 May 1873)
Empress Alexandra Feodorovna of Russia (6 June 1872 – 17 July 1918)
Princess Marie of Hesse and by Rhine (24 May 1874 – 16 November 1878)

His son Ernest, Ernest Louis Charles Albert William (German: Ernst Ludwig Karl Albrecht Wilhelm; 25 November 1868 – 9 October 1937) was the last Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine, reigning from 1892 until 1918. His nickname was "Ernie".

Ling Clan© 2017 All rights Reserved
Web Design:  Webalicious
Email:  Webalicious™.