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~ The Ling Clan ~

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It started in Darmstadt... well actually it started in the Garden of Eden, but I couldn't find any records back that far. Anyway, in Darmstadt, located in the state of Hesse, in the southern part of Germany, Anthony Ling, was born March 25, 1740. Another interesting fact; 200 years later I was born, the last of the male Lings in our family tree. Clyde Jr. only had two girls. But, I'm getting ahead of myself. We can go back as far as the Holy Roman Empire and start there... But before we get started, I just had my DNA tested and here are the results; 96.3% British and Irish, 1.8% Italian, 1% Ashkenazi Jewish and 0.9% Central African. Very interesting info about the Ashkenazi Jews. Follow the link.

I will be adding more to this site soon as I have recently found our ancestry link going as far back as 1469, the last name then was Langk, changed to Lange aka Lang and THEN Ling. There seems to be a huge difference in name spelling back in the day. maybe it was due to the fact that writing ones name was not something they could do or that the writing was so chicken scratch due to the writing instruments of the time. Who knows. Now we can start...

~ Holy Roman Empire ~

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The Holy Roman Empire was a German empire that existed from 962 to 1806 in Central Europe. It was ruled by the Holy Roman Emperor, Charlemagne being the first. Its character changed during the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period, when the power of the emperor gradually weakened in favour of the princes. In its last centuries, its character became quite close to a union of territories.

The empire’s territory was centered on the Kingdom of Germany, and included neighboring territories, which at its peak included the Kingdom of Italy and the Kingdom of Burgundy. For much of its history, the Empire consisted of hundreds of smaller sub-units, principalities, duchies, counties, Free Imperial Cities and other domains.

On 25 December 800, Pope Leo III crowned the Frankish king Charlemagne as Emperor, reviving the title in Western Europe after more than three centuries. The title continued in the Carolingian family until 888, after which it was contested by the rulers of Italy in a series of civil wars until the death of the last Italian claimant, Berengar, in 924. The title was revived in 962 when Otto I was crowned emperor, fashioning himself as the successor of Charlemagne and beginning a continuous existence of the empire for over eight centuries. Some historians refer to the coronation of Charlemagne as the origin of the empire, while others prefer the coronation of Otto I as its beginning. Scholars generally concur, however, in relating an evolution of the institutions and principles constituting the empire, describing a gradual assumption of the imperial title and role. The Massacre at Verden produced perhaps the greatest stain on his reputation.

The precise term “Holy Roman Empire” was not used until the 13th century, but the concept of translatio imperii[e] was fundamental to the prestige of the emperor, the notion that he held supreme power inherited from the emperors of Rome. The office of Holy Roman Emperor was traditionally elective, although frequently controlled by dynasties. The German prince-electors, the highest ranking noblemen of the empire, usually elected one of their peers as “King of the Romans”, and he would later be crowned emperor by the Pope; the tradition of papal coronations was discontinued in the 16th century. The empire never achieved the extent of political unification formed in France, evolving instead into a decentralized, limited elective monarchy composed of hundreds of sub-units, principalities, duchies, counties, Free Imperial Cities, and other domains. The power of the emperor was limited, and while the various princes, lords, and kings of the empire were vassals and subjects who owed the emperor their allegiance, they also possessed an extent of privileges that gave them de facto sovereignty within their territories. Emperor Francis II dissolved the empire on 6 August 1806, after its defeat by Napoleon at the Battle of Austerlitz.

The territories and dominion of the Holy Roman Empire in terms of present-day states comprised Germany (except Southern Schleswig), Austria (except Burgenland), the Czech Republic, Switzerland and Liechtenstein, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg and Slovenia (except Prekmurje), besides significant parts of eastern France (mainly Artois, Alsace, Franche-Comté, French Flanders, Savoy and Lorraine), northern Italy (mainly Lombardy, Piedmont, Emilia-Romagna, Tuscany, Trentino and South Tyrol), and western Poland (mainly Silesia, Pomerania and Neumark). Since this was all territory of the Holy Roman Empire, one might surmise that Hitler wanted to get it all back, ergo WWII.

The term sacrum (i.e., “holy” in the sense of "consecrated") in connection with the medieval Roman Empire was used from 1157, under Frederick I Barbarossa. (“Holy Empire”; the form “Holy Roman Empire” is attested from 1254 onward). The term was added to reflect Frederick's ambition to dominate Italy and the Papacy. Before 1157, the realm was merely referred to as the Roman Empire.

In a decree following the 1512 Diet of Cologne, the name was officially changed to Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation. This form was first used in a document in 1474.The Holy Roman Empire was named after the Roman Empire and was considered its continuation.

The French Enlightenment writer Voltaire remarked sardonically: This agglomeration which was called and which still calls itself the Holy Roman Empire was neither holy, nor Roman, nor an empire.”

The Holy Roman Empire looked to Charlemagne, King of the Franks, as its founder, who had been crowned Emperor of the Romans on Christmas Day in 800 by Pope Leo III. The Western Roman Empire was thus revived by transferring it to the Frankish king. This remained the basis for the Holy Roman Empire, at least in theory, until its demise in 1806.

The Carolingian imperial crown was initially disputed among the Carolingian rulers of Western Francia (France) and Eastern Francia (Germany), with first the western king (Charles the Bald) and then the eastern (Charles the Fat) attaining the prize. However, after the death of Charles the Fat in 888, the Carolingian Empire broke asunder, never to be restored. According to Regino of Prüm, each part of the realm elected a “kinglet” from its own bowels. After the death of Charles the Fat, those crowned Emperor by the Pope controlled only territories in Italy. The last such Emperor was Berengar I of Italy who died in 924.

~ Hesse, Germany ~

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The English name “Hesse” comes from French or the Hessian dialect. The variant “Hessia” comes from the medieval Hassia. The German term Hessen is used by the European Commission, not because it is English, but because their general policy is to leave regional names untranslated. The term “Hessia” ultimately derives from a Germanic tribe called the Chatti, who settled in the region in the first century B.C. The cultural region of Hesse includes both the State of Hesse and the area known as Rhenish Hesse in the neighboring Rhineland-Palatinate state. The oldest and second largest Hessian city, Mainz, is in Rhenish Hesse. The State of Hesse, Land Hessen, literally “Country of Hesse”, is part of the larger cultural region. It has an area of 8,150 sq mi and just over six million inhabitants. The state capital is Wiesbaden. Hesse's largest city is Frankfurt.

An inhabitant of Hesse is called a Hessian
Hesse (masculine)
Hessin (feminine)

During the American Revolution, 1775 to 1783, Hessian soldiers were hired out to Great Britain to help fight the colonists. The Hessian’s were told they would be helping the colonists to fight the indians... yeah right!

As early as the Paleolithic period, the Central Hessian region was inhabited. Due to the favorable climate of the location, people lived there about 50,000 years ago during the last glacial period, as burial sites show from this era. Finds of paleolitical tools in southern Hesse in Rüsselsheim suggest Pleistocene hunters about 13,000 years ago.

The Züschen tomb is a prehistoric burial monument, located between Lohne and Züschen, near Fritzlar, Hesse, Germany. Classified as a gallery grave or a Hessian-Westphalian stone cist, it is one of the most important megalithic monuments in Central Europe. Dating to the late 4th millennium BC (and possibly remaining in use until the early 3rd), it belongs to the Late Neolithic Wartberg culture.

A Famous resident of Hesse was Jacob Ludwig Carl Grimm. READ MORE

~ Darmstadt, Hesse, Germany ~

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Darmstadt is a city in the Bundesland (federal state) of Hesse in Germany, located in the southern part of the Rhine Main Area.

The sandy soils in the Darmstadt area, ill-suited for agriculture in times before industrial fertilization, prevented any larger settlement from developing, until the city became the seat of the Landgraves of Hessen-Darmstadt in the 16th century. Langrave Philip I of Hessen-Darmstadt, Philip was the son of Landgrave William II of Hesse and his second wife Anna of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. His father died when Philip was five years old, and in 1514 his mother, after a series of struggles with the Estates of Hesse, succeeded in becoming regent on his behalf. (read more)

As the administrative centre of an increasingly prosperous duchy, the city gained in prominence during the following centuries. In the 20th century, industry (especially chemicals) as well as large science and electronics (later information technology) sectors became increasingly important, and are still a major part of the city’s economy. Darmstadt also has a large tertiary education sector, with three major universities and numerous associated institutions.

Darmstadt is one of few cities (as opposed to smaller towns) in Germany which does not lie close to a river, lake or coast. It is the sunniest city in the state of Hesse. The chemical element darmstadtium (atomic number 110) is named after it, having been synthesized in the GSI Centre for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt-Wixhausen.

The name Darmstadt first appears towards the end of the 11th century, then Darmundestat. Literally translated, the current German name Darmstadt means “Intestine City.” This is just a coincidence however, and the origins of the name are unknown. 'Dar-mund' in Middle Low German is translated as “Boggy Headlands”, but it could be a misspelling in local dialect of another name. Even locals often believe, incorrectly, that the name derives from the ‘Darmbach’ (a small stream formerly running through the city). In fact the stream received its current name much later, after the city, not vice versa.

Darmstadt was chartered as a city by the Holy Roman Emperor Ludwig the Bavarian in 1330, at which time it belonged to the counts of Katzenelnbogen. The city, then called Darmstait, became a secondary residence for the counts, with a small castle being established at the site of the current, much larger edifice.

When the house of Katzenelnbogen became extinct in 1479, the city was passed to the Landgraviate of Hesse, and was the seat of the ruling landgraves (1567–1806) and thereafter (to 1918) of the Grand Dukes of Hesse.

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